“Wait? Is that Spanish? BUT THAT’S WRONG!” Uh, no.“Wait? Is that Spanish? BUT THAT’S WRONG!” Uh, no.

Note: this is a republication of an old Sci-Fi Saturdays that I did at the original Claude & Monet site.  As the upcoming relaunch will not include SFS, I’ll be copying many of my favorites here.

“Hey, how come that guy is speaking Spanish? It’s an English webcomic, write English!”
– email from yesterday

Okay, it’s questions like this that make things interesting. Of course they’re referring to Sandoval’s lapse into his native language during Thursday’s page. And though I provided a translation (as well as a translation for Monet’s Scottish slang, something I don’t expect Americans to be familiar with either), I got at least one email asking why I used a foreign language.

To which I say: really? That’s the problem? I can think of at least a couple of webcomics that use languages other than English as advertised and may or may not translate it as needed. Doubtless that there are other works in other media that I could quote as well if we sat here long enough. I see no shame in the use of Chinese or Spanish or Hindi or Japanese or whatever, so long as it’s translated.

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Sad that the creator now needs the creation.Sad that the creator now needs the creation.

You would think that after creating a successful game such as Operation, John Spinello would be a wealthy man.  After all, it’s generated tens of millions of dollars for Milton Bradley and its successor, Hasbro, having been touched such cultural cornerstones as The Simpsons to Disney.  But it didn’t.

And now, the creator of Operation is in need of an operation himself…but Spinello cannot afford the $25000 needed for his oral surgery.

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I should point out that after I got this, life red ringed for me until this morning. At 4AM.I should point out that after I got this, life red ringed for me until this morning. At 4AM.

Disclaimer: While I’m a senior executive at Anime USA, nothing I say here should be taken as official AUSA policy.  Or, for that matter, seriously.

It goes without saying that running an anime convention is tough.  Tougher still while you’re trying to blog about it while working the Info Booth and performing duties as a member of the Board of Directors.  It’s grueling.  Little sleep, exhaustion for a week, and you never really know whether all the fuckups you did during the year translated to something worthwhile.

In the case of Anime USA 2014, I’m still not sure.

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As you can see, things are a little slow.As you can see, things are a little slow.

Disclaimer: While I’m a senior executive at Anime USA, nothing I say here should be taken as official AUSA policy.  Or, for that matter, seriously.

Hello all, and welcome to another exciting adventure at Anime USA!  This year’s edition is chock full of…anime stuff.  Yeah, it’s a little early right now, so things are a little slow.  This year, I’m taking a spin at the Info Booth, mainly because I’m lazy and didn’t feel like doing much this year, so I took a sabbatical from the all-year staff (or for those of us dropping AUSA science, “planning staff”) for only the site staff.

How this year is going to impact things I don’t know, but we shall see.

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